Declaration of Independence


Declaration of Independence
   The United Nations Partition Plan (see PALESTINE PARTITION PLAN) of November 1947 provided for the establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine. The date of the termination of the British mandate was set for 15 May 1948, and with that date nearing, the Zionist General Council decided that the Jewish people would establish an independent regime in their homeland. This decision, put forth in a resolution, paved the way for the Declaration of Independence. A five-man committee was established to prepare the declaration, and a four-man committee, including David Ben-Gurion, worked out the final draft. The Declaration of Independence was read on 14 May and went into effect the following day. The declaration provides for a Jewish state in the land of Israel, and it recalls the religious and spiritual connection of the Jewish people to the land of Israel, but it does not mention boundaries. It notes that "it will guarantee freedom of religion and conscience, of language, education, and culture." The document does not address the meaning of a Jewish state or the roles that would be played by religious forces and movements (especially by their political parties) in such an entity. See Appendix A.

Historical Dictionary of Israel. .

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  • Declaration of Independence — Declaration Dec la*ra tion, n. [F. d[ e]claration, fr. L. declaratio, fr. declarare. See {Declare}.] 1. The act of declaring, or publicly announcing; explicit asserting; undisguised token of a ground or side taken on any subject; proclamation;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Declaration of Independence EP — by No Americana Released July 11, 2011 (2011 07 11) Recorded Fiveways Studios …   Wikipedia

  • Declaration of Independence — Declaration of Independence, n. (Amer. Hist.) The document promugated, July 4, 1776, by the leaders of the thirteen British Colonies in America that they have formed an independent country. See note below. [PJC] Note: The Declaration of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Declaration of Independence — Independence In de*pend ence, n. [Cf. F. ind[ e]pendance.] [1913 Webster] 1. The state or quality of being independent; freedom from dependence; exemption from reliance on, or control by, others; self subsistence or maintenance; direction of one… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Declaration of independence — (engl., spr. diklarēsch n ŏw indipénndens), die Unabhängigkeitserklärung der Vereinigten Staaten von Nordamerika, die am 4. Juli 1776 in Philadelphia von den Vertretern der 13 Kolonien unterzeichnet wurde …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Declaration of independence — (engl., spr. dĭklärréhsch n ŏf indĕpénndĕnß), die Unabhängigkeitserklärung der Ver. Staaten von Amerika vom 4. Juli 1776 …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Declaration of Independence — n. A document written by Thomas Jefferson and adopted by the thirteen colonies on July 4, 1776, listing the colonies’ grievances against England and declaring the colonies a separate nation free from allegiance to Great Britain. The Essential Law …   Law dictionary

  • Declaration of Independence —   [deklə reɪʃn əv ɪndɪ pendəns], die Unabhängigkeitserklärung der USA …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Declaration of Independence — n. the formal statement, written by Thomas Jefferson and adopted July 4, 1776, by the Second Continental Congress, declaring the thirteen American colonies free and independent of Great Britain: there were fifty six signers …   English World dictionary

  • Declaration of independence — Unilateral declaration of independence redirects here. For the specific Rhodesian document, see Unilateral Declaration of Independence. This article is about the type of document. For the first document to be generally called such, see United… …   Wikipedia

  • Declaration of Independence — 1. the public act by which the Second Continental Congress, on July 4, 1776, declared the Colonies to be free and independent of England. 2. the document embodying it. * * * (July 4, 1776) Document approved by the Continental Congress that… …   Universalium


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